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Horseradish root

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== Name Variations ==
 
== Name Variations ==
* German mustard
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* german mustard
   
 
== About Horseradish root ==
 
== About Horseradish root ==
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It has been speculated that the word is a partial translation of its German name Meerrettich. The element Meer (meaning 'ocean, sea', although it could be derived from the similar sounding Mähren, the German word for Moravia, an area where the vegetable is cultivated and used extensively) is pronounced like the English word mare, which might have been reinterpreted as horseradish. On the other hand, many English plant names have "horse" as an element denoting strong or coarse, so the etymology of the English word (which is attested in print from at least 1597) is uncertain.
 
It has been speculated that the word is a partial translation of its German name Meerrettich. The element Meer (meaning 'ocean, sea', although it could be derived from the similar sounding Mähren, the German word for Moravia, an area where the vegetable is cultivated and used extensively) is pronounced like the English word mare, which might have been reinterpreted as horseradish. On the other hand, many English plant names have "horse" as an element denoting strong or coarse, so the etymology of the English word (which is attested in print from at least 1597) is uncertain.
   
Horseradish contains potassium, calcium, magnesium and phosphorus, as well as volatile oils, such as mustard oil, which is antibiotic. Fresh, the plant contains 177,9 mg/100 g of vitamin C.
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Horseradish contains potassium, calcium, magnesium and phosphorus, as well as volatile oils, such as mustard oil, which is antibiotic. Fresh, the plant contains 177,9 mg/100 g of vitamin C.
   
 
The enzyme horseradish peroxidase, found in the plant, is used extensively in molecular biology in antibody amplification and detection, among other things. For example, "In recent years the technique of marking neurons with the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) has become a major tool. In its brief history, this method has probably been used by more neurobiologists than have used the Golgi stain since its discovery in 1870."[1]
 
The enzyme horseradish peroxidase, found in the plant, is used extensively in molecular biology in antibody amplification and detection, among other things. For example, "In recent years the technique of marking neurons with the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) has become a major tool. In its brief history, this method has probably been used by more neurobiologists than have used the Golgi stain since its discovery in 1870."[1]
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== [[:Category:Horseradish Recipes|Horseradish Recipes]] ==
 
== [[:Category:Horseradish Recipes|Horseradish Recipes]] ==
   
== Sources ==
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== Source ==
 
* [http://www.fruitsandveggiesmatter.gov/month/root_vegetables.html Vegetable of the Month: Root Vegetables] by the US Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, public domain government resource—original source of recipe
 
* [http://www.fruitsandveggiesmatter.gov/month/root_vegetables.html Vegetable of the Month: Root Vegetables] by the US Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, public domain government resource—original source of recipe
   
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